THE LIST: Bob Menendez’s 500+ career votes for higher taxes, fees

By The Staff
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Corruption, drug prices, and Donald Trump are dominating the conversation in New Jersey’s U.S. Senate race down the homestretch.

Another issue which isn’t getting as much attention: taxes.

Incumbent Democrat Bob Menendez didn’t just vote against last year’s historic tax cut package; Menendez voted to levy higher taxes and fees over 500 times throughout his legislative career in Trenton and Washington.

Here’s a full list (h/t Hugin for Senate):

Menendez New Jersey Legislature votes

AT LEAST 408 INCREASES

1988

P.L 1988, C. 25 – ASC for A1784- Uninsured Employers Fund Act

1 – Fee -Annual Surcharge

P.L. 1988, C. 26- A2210- An ACT eliminating the annual Second Injury Fund assessment established by R,S. 34:15-94, creating an annual surcharge to be levied upon certain policyholders and self insured employers

2 – Fees – Surcharge and penalty fee for not submitting report

P.L. 1988, C. 31- S778- Amendment to “Dental Auxiliaries Act”

1 – Fee – Inactive renewal fee

P.L. 1988, C. 35- S1535- Amendment to Clam Licenses

4 – Fees – Licensing fees for different segments

P.L. 1988, C. 67- S1983- an ACT concerning temporary or emergency transportation of alcoholic beverages

2 – Fees – Special permit fee and surcharges when designated agent issues permit

P.L. 1988, C. 73- A556- Fees/Charges payable to Department of Banking

48 – Fees – Various filing and other fees for banks and state associations

P.L. 1988, C. 109- A593- Probate Proceedings

88 – Fees – Raised all fees associated with Surrogate filings

P.L. 1988, C. 130- A2793- “Uniform Limited Partnership Law”

4 – Fees – New certificate fees

P.L. 1988, C. 140- S2154- “County Improvement Authorities Law”

1 – Fees-  Expanded on original law which empowered county improvement authority to charge fees

1989

P.L. 1989, C. 2- A135- Telecommunications Taxing Methods

1 – Taxes- Restructuring of tax language and methods

P.L. 1989, C. 34- A2853- Medical Waste

2 – Fees- Generator registration fee and Transporter Application Fee

P.L. 1989, C. 93- A3021- ACT concerning a pilot clinic for the spaying and neutering of dogs and cats

10 – Fees- Fees in total for spaying and neutering dogs of various sizes, all of which were increased

P.L. 1989, C. 98- A4014- Homemaker-home health aides certification

1 – Fees- Application fee (determined by the board)

P.L. 1989, C. 209- S205- ACT concerning winery licenses

8 – Fees- Different licensing fees, each with specific graduated rates depending on production

P.L. 1989, C. 234- S1554- ACT concerning establishments using artificial suntan sources

1 – Fee – Annual registration fee (unspecified amount) paid to Dept. of Health

P.L. 1989, C. 239- S3850- ACT regulating sale of real property outside of New Jersey by developers

3 – Fees- Registration, inspection, and consolidated filing fees

P.L. 1989, C. 240- S3867- ACT concerning regulated medical waste generator fees

9 – Fees-  Annual generator registration fee based on volume of regulated medical waste produced

1990

P.L. 1990, C.8 – A1- Fair Automobile Insurance Reform Act of 1990

18 – Fees and Taxes- Includes registration fees for professionals and automobiles, multiple tax increases    on types of insurance

P.L. 1990, C. 39 – A3608- Act Concerning Taxes on Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products

2 – Fees and Taxes –  tax on cigarette consumers and wholesalers

P.L. 1990, C. 40 – A3610- An Act Concerning the Sales and Use Tax

17 – Fees and Taxes – sales and use taxes

P.L. 1990, C. 41 – A3611-  An Act Increasing the Excise Tax on Alcoholic Beverages

8 – Fees and Taxes – tax on sale of beer, liquor, and wine

P.L. 1990, C. 42 – A3612 – An Act Imposing a Tax on the Sale and Use of Petroleum Products

2 – Fees and Taxes – Tax on gross receipts for Refiners and Distributors

P.L. 1990, C. 78- A3262- ACT concerning hazardous substance discharge prevention

4 – Taxes-  transfer taxes on hazardous materials and petroleum

P.L. 1990, C. 103- A3258-  “New Jersey Commercial Driver License Act”

4 – Fees- Learner’s permit, additional endorsement, commercial licence, and commercial license renewal fees

1991

P.L. 1991, C. 19- A3993- ACT concerning taxation of petroleum products purchased for use by the United States government

2 – Taxes- Tax on petroleum products

P.L. 1991, C. 23- S2135-  ACT concerning a tax on hotel occupancy

1 – Taxes- additional occupancy taxes on hotel owners

P.L. 1991, C. 42- A4017- Savings banks permit conversion

24 – Fees- Department of Banking Fees

P.L. 1991, C. 54- A3309- ACT providing for the creation of solid waste collection districts

1- Taxes- Establish a tax to fund the support of solid waste collection districts (amount based on value of all taxable property in the district)

P.L. 1991, C. 78- A3469 -ACT concerning license and examination fees for convalescent and nursing home administrators

2 – Fees- License and examination fees

P.L. 1991, C. 79- ACS for A3774- ACT concerning shellfish and the taking thereof in the waters of this State

3 – Fees- Surf clam and bait license fees and bushel fee

P.L. 1991, C. 99- A877 – ACT concerning environmental health

1 – Fees- Service fee (to be charged by a certified local health agency and not to exceed the cost of the service provided)

P.L. 1991, C. 177- S3452 – ACT creating additional Superior Court judgeships, raising certain filing fees

61 – Fees- Filing fees, virtually all of which were raised substantially

P.L. 1991, C. 189 – A3565 – Act Concerning the Regulation of the Apparel Industry

2 – Fees –  Requires registration fee

P.L. 1991, C. 202 – S2602 – Act Concerning Remediation of Structural Defects

1 – Fees – $100 surcharge on new home sales for fund to cover plywood claims

P.L. 1991, C. 205- A3061 – Act Concerning DOL and employee underpayment

26 – Fees- application, examination, inspection, and permit fees

P.L. 1991, C. 247- A2729 – ACT concerning corporate filing fees

2 – Fees- Filing Fees

P.L. 1991, C. 288- A1332 – ACT authorizing certain municipalities to impose certain taxes

1 – Taxes- Certain parking taxes, but no exact numbers specified

P.L. 1991, C. 297- A1840 – ACT concerning motor vehicles

1 – Fees- Allows municipalities to establish permit fees

P.L. 1991, C. 322- A3475 – ACT concerning all-terrain vehicles

4 – Fees- Registration fees and penalties

P.L. 1991, C. 339- S3327 – ACT concerning service charges by counties for certain checks

1 – Fees- cap on service charge fee

P.L. 1991, C. 461- S3497 – ACT concerning licensing of blood banks

6 – Fees-  License and service fees

1992

P.L. 1992, C. 23- A44 – ACT to revise the statutory law pertaining to the enforcement of the motor fuels tax

9 – Fees and Taxes- Multiple License fees

P.L 1992 C. 136 – S522 – An Act increasing the fee charged for a Marriage License

1 – Fees- Marriage License fee

P.L. 1992 C. 188 – A1863 – An Act to provide a stable funding source for enforcement of the Alcoholic Beverage Law, to more equitably distribute the cost of regulating the industry by increasing fees and assessed under Title 33, amending various sections of statutory law, and supplementing Title 33 of the Revised Statutes.

16 – Fees-Filing and Permit fees

P.L. 1992, C. 210 – S764 – An Act concerning the New Jersey Waterfowl Stamp and amending P.L. 1983, c. 504

2 – Fees – Additional New Jersey Waterfowl Stamps added

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Menendez US Senate Votes

31 VOTES IN FAVOR OF INCREASING TAXES- MANY OF THOSE VOTES WERE IN FAVOR OF MULTIPLE INCREASES

2018

  • 2/9/18 – HR 1892 – Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 – Repeals tax credit employers of indian tribe members, repeals cost of film theater or tv production as tax credit – Concurrence – Yea – (71-28) Y(34R-36D) N(16R-11D)

2017

  • 12/20/17 – HR 1 – Tax Cuts and Jobs Act – Conference – Nay – (51-48) Y(51R) N(46D)
  • 12/2/17 – HR 1 – Tax Cuts and Jobs Act – Bill – Nay – (51-48) Y(51R) N(46D)

2015

  • 10/1/15 – HR 2029 Consolidated Appropriations Act 2016 – Extends numerous tax credits and WTC health program – (he voted for the bill though) – Cloture – Nay – (65-33) Y(27R-37D) N(26R-6D)

2014

  • 7/29/14 – S Amnt 3583 to HR 5021 – Appropriates Funds to the Highway Trust Fund – Extends fee on items brought in to country, establishes penalty for failure to meet due diligence requirements for child tax credit – Amendment – Yea – (66-31) Y(13R-51D) N(30R)
  • 6/11/14 – S 2432 – Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act – Establishes tax for a “high income taxpayer” – Cloture – Yea – (56-38) Y(51D) N(37R) CO SPONSOR
  • 6/4/14 – S 2432 – Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act – Establishes tax for a “high income taxpayer” – Senate – Yea – (56-38) Y(51D) N(37R) CO SPONSOR

2013

  • 12/18/13 – H J Res 59- Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2014 – Increases discretionary spending, increases FERS employee contributions, increases security fee for airline passengers – Concurrence – Yea – (64-36) Y(9R-58D) N(36R)
  • 9/30/13 – H J Res 59- Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2014 – Repeals 2.3% tax on medical devices – Vote to table – Yea – (54-46) Y(52D) N(46R)
  • 7/24/13- S Amt 1778 – Limits Interest Rates for Certain Fed Student Loans – Establishes .55% tax on modified AGI over $1 million – Adopt amendment – Yea – (46-53) Y(45D) N(46R-6D)
  • 5/6/13 – S 743 – Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013 – Allows states to collect tax from online sales – Bill passed – Yea- (69-27) Y(21R-46D) N(22R-5D)
  • 4/25/13 – S 743 – Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013 – Allows states to collect tax from online sales – Cloture – Yea- (63-30) Y(15R-46D) N(25R-5D)
  • 1/1/13 – HR 8 – Job Protection and Recession Prevention Act of 2012 – Increases capital gains from 15 to 20%, increases estate tax from 35 to 40% – Bill – Yea – (89-8) Y(40R-47D) N(5R-3D)

2012

  • 7/25/12 – S 3412 – Middle Class Tax Cut – Increases income tax rate for taxpayers earning more than $250k from 35 to 39.6% – Bill – Yea – (51-48) Y(50D) N(46R)
  • 7/25/12 – S Amnt 2573- Tax Hike Prevention Act of 2012 – Extends tax cuts, increases AMT amount, would require eventual repeal of AMT and reductions in top tax rates – On Amendment – Nay – (45-54) Y(44R) N(50D)
  • 4/16/12 – S 2230 – Establishes a Minimum 30% tax rate for high-income taxpayers – Cloture- Yea

2011

  • 12/14/11 – S J Res 10 – Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution – Requires balanced budget – on amendment – Nay
  • 12/1/11 – S 1917 – Extends payroll tax cut and establishes tax on income over $1 million – establishes 3.25% tax on AGI of 1 mil for taxpayers or 500k married filing separately – Motion to proceed – Yea
  • 12/1/11 – S 1931 – Reduces Payroll Tax Rate – Extends payroll tax holiday of 4.2% – Motion to proceed – Nay
  • 11/10/11 – S Amnt 928 – Amendment to HR 674 that repeals ACA, requires constitutional amendment balanced budget, caps tax rates- On the amendment – Nay
    • Otherwise known as the McCain Amendment.
  • 11/3/11 – S 1769 – Transportation infrastructure appropriations and tax on income over 1 mil – establishes .7% tax on AGI excess of $1mil – Motion to proceed – Yea
  • 10/11/11 – S 1660 – American Jobs Act of 2011 – establishes 5.6% tax on AGI if it is more than $1 mil. – Cloture – Yea
  • 6/14/11 – S Amnt 436 – AMNT to S 782 Repeals volumetric ethanol excise tax – Cloture – Nay

2010

  • 3/25/10 – HR 4872 – Health Care Reconciliation Act – Increases penalties for employers who don’t offer healthcare – bill vote- Yea (56-43)

2009

  • 12/24/09 – HR 3590 – ACA – Bill – Yea
  • 12/23/09 – HR 3590 – ACA – Cloture – Yea
  • 2/6/09 – S Amnt 538 – Tax Credit Substitute Amendment – replaced bill with another giving all taxpayers earning less than $250k a tax credit of 5,143 or 10,286 if filing jointly – on the motion – Nay

2006

  • 8/3/06 – HR 5970 – Death/estate Tax and Minimum wage bill – extended numerous deductions and credits – cloture – Nay
  • 5/11/06 – HR 4297 – Tax Relief extension reconciliation act of 2005 – continues tax cuts, exemptions and credits – conference report – Nay
  • 2/2/06 – S Amnt 2735 – Tax rate extension amendment, amendment to HR 4297 – vote to waive budget act to authorize $21.9 bil to VA and offset cost by raising tax rates on capital gains and dividends – on the motion – Yea
  • 2/2/06- S Amnt 2737 – military funding and tax cuts amendment, amendment to HR 4297 – appropriates $47.27 bil to military and repeals tax cuts to capital gains and dividends to 2010 back to 2008. – on the motion – Yea

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Menendez House Votes

68 VOTES IN FAVOR OF INCREASING TAXES- MANY OF THOSE VOTES WERE IN FAVOR OF MULTIPLE INCREASES

2005

  • 12/8/2005 – HR 4297 – Tax relief extension Reconciliation Act of 2005- Continues reduced tax rates of 15% and 5% on capital gains and dividends, extends credits – on the bill – Nay
  • 4/13/2005 – HR 8 – Death/Estate Tax Tax Repeal Permanency Act of 2005 – Bill would make trial termination of estate tax permanent – cloture – Nay

2004

  • 4/28/04 – HR 4181 – Marriage Penalty Relief – Nay – Passage of the bill that would permanently extend tax provisions eliminating the so-called marriage penalty by making the standard deduction for married couples double that of single taxpayers and increasing the upper limit of the 15 percent tax bracket for married couples to twice that of singles. It also would make permanent higher income limits for married couples eligible to receive the refundable earned-income tax credit.” (H.R. 4181, CQ Vote #138: Passed 323-95: R 220- 0; D 102-95; I 1-0
  • 5/5/2004 – HR 4227 – Middle-Class AMT Relief Act of 2004 – Extends AMT relief Act to 2005 – Bill – Nay

2003

  • 5/23/03 – HR 2 – Tax Reductions – Nay – Adoption of the conference report on the bill that would provide $350 billion in tax breaks over 11 years. It would provide $20 billion in state aid that consists of $10 billion for Medicaid and $10 billion to be used at states’ discretion. The agreement includes a new top tax rate of 15 percent on capital gains and dividends through 2007 (5 percent for lower-income taxpayers in 2007 and no tax in 2008). Income tax cuts enacted in 2001 and scheduled to take effect in 2006 would be accelerated. The child tax credit would increase to $1,000 through 2004. The standard deduction for married couples would be double that for a single filer through 2004. Tax breaks for businesses would include increasing the deduction that small businesses could take on investments to $100,000 through 2005. CQ Vote #225: Adopted (thus sent to the Senate) 231-200: R 224-1; D 7-198; I 0-1
  • 6/12/03 – HR 1308 – Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 – Nay – On motion that the house instruct conferees. CQ Vote #275 (205-201)
  • 9/23/04 – HR 1308 – Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 – Nay – Agreeing to the Conference Report To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to end certain abusive tax practices, to provide tax relief and simplification, and for other purposes. CQ Vote # 472 339-65: R213-0; D 125-65; I 1-0

2002

  • 2/14/02 – HR 622 – Unemployment and Tax Breaks – Nay – Thomas, R- Calif., motion, to concur in a House amendment to Senate amendments to the bill that would extend unemployment benefits for 13 weeks and provide additional tax reductions. The bill would accelerate a reduction in the 27 percent tax rate for individuals, allow another depreciation equipment tax credit for businesses, offer a health insurance refundable tax credit, and give a tax rebate to individuals who failed to receive the total $300 rebate from last year’s tax package. CQ Vote #38: Motion agreed to 225-199: R 214-1; D 10-197; I 1-1
  • 4/18/02 – H. Res. 390 – Permanent Tax Cuts – Nay – Hastings, R-Wash., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the resolution (H Res 390) to provide for House floor consideration of Senate amendments to the bill that would permanently extend the cuts in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax reduction package, many of which are set to expire in 2010. CQ Vote #101: Motion agreed to 219-206: R 218-0; D 0-205; I 1-1
  • 4/18/02 – H. Res 390 – Permanent Tax Cuts – Nay – Adoption of the resolution (H Res 390) to provide for House floor consideration of the Senate amendments to the bill that would permanently extend the cuts in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax reduction package, many of which are set to expire in 2010. CQ Vote #102: Adopted 218-205: R 217-0; D 0-204; I 1-1
  • 4/18/02 – HR 586 – Permanent Tax Cuts – Nay – Thomas, R-Calif., motion to concur in a House amendment to Senate amendments to the bill that would permanently extend the cuts in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax reduction package, many of which are set to expire in 2010. It would extend reductions in income tax rates, relief of the marriage penalty, elimination of the estate tax, doubling of the child tax credit, and expansion of pension and education provisions. The bill also would revise various Internal Revenue Service tax provisions, including penalty, interest and collection provisions. It would change penalties for failure to pay estimated taxes; waive minor, first-time error penalties; exclude interest on unintentional overpayments from taxable income; and allow the IRS greater discretion in disciplining employees who violate policies. CQ Vote #103: Motion agreed to 229-198: R 219-1; D 9-196; I 1-1
  • 6/6/02 – HR 2143 – Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on the rule (H Res 435) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would permanently extend the repeal of the estate and gift tax contained in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax cut law. CQ Vote #215: Motion agreed to 223-201: R 216-0; D 6-200; I 1-1
  • 6/6/02 – HR 2143 – Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 435) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would permanently extend the repeal of the estate and gift tax contained in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax cut law.” (HR 2143, CQ Vote #216: Adopted 227-195: R 216-0; D 10-194; I 1-1
  • 6/6/02 – HR 2143 – Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Passage of the bill that would permanently extend the repeal of the estate and gift tax contained in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax cut law. CQ Vote #219: Passed 256-171: R 214-4; D 41-166; I 1-1
  • 9/19/02 – H. Res. 527 – Welfare Overhaul and Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Adoption of the resolution (H Res 527) to provide for House floor consideration of resolutions that would express the sense of the House that Congress should clear a bill permanently extending the estate tax repeal (HR 2143) and welfare overhaul legislation (HR 4737). Vote #398: Adopted 213-200: R 212-0; D 1-199; I 0-1
  • 9/19/02 – HR 2143 – House Support for Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Adoption of the resolution that would express the sense of the House that Congress should, before it adjourns, clear for the president’s signature legislation (HR 2143) that would permanently extend the repeal of the estate and gift tax contained in last year’s $1.35 trillion tax cut law. CQ Vote #401: Adopted 242-158: R 200-3; D 42-155; I 0-0
  • 9/25/02 – H. Res. 547 – Employee Pensions, Married Couples Tax Relief, Pension Benefits – Nay – Sessions, R-Texas, motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule (H Res 547) to provide for House floor consideration of resolutions that would express the sense of the House that Congress should clear bills that would increase employees’ control over their pension funds and give them more access to investment information (HR 3762), and permanently extend breaks for married couples (HR 4019) and additional incentives for pension and retirement contributions (HR 4931). CQ Vote #413: Motion agreed to 217-200: R 216-0; D 1-199; I 0-1

2001

  • 3/8/01 – H. Res. 83 – Income Tax Reduction – Nay – Reynolds, R-N.Y., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule (H Res 83) to provide for House floor consideration of the measure that would lower federal income taxes by restructuring five tax brackets into four — 10, 15, 25 and 33 percent. CQ Vote #37: Motion agreed to 220-204: R 215-0; D 4-203; I 1-1
  • 3/8/01 – H. Res. 83 – Income Tax Reduction – Nay – Reynolds, R-N.Y., motion to table (kill) the John, D-La., motion to reconsider the vote on the motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule (H Res 83) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would lower federal income taxes by restructuring five tax brackets into four — 10, 15, 25 and 33 percent. CQ Vote #38: Motion agreed to 217-205: R 214-0; D 2- 204; I 1-1
  • 3/8/01 – H. Res. 83 – Income Tax Reduction – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 83) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would lower federal income taxes by restructuring the five existing tax brackets into four — 10, 15, 25 and 33 percent. CQ Vote #39: Adopted 220-204: R 216-0; D 3-203; I 1-1
  • 3/8/01 – H. Res. 83 – Income Tax Reduction – Nay – Reynolds, R-N.Y., motion to table (kill) the Pryce, R-Ohio, motion to reconsider the vote on adoption of the rule (H Res 83) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would lower federal income taxes by restructuring the five existing tax brackets into four — 10, 15, 25 and 33 percent. CQ Vote #40: Motion agreed to 221-197: R 215-0; D 5-196; I 1-1
  • 3/8/01 – HR 3 – Income Tax Reduction – Yea – Stenholm, D-Texas, motion to recommit the bill to the House Ways and Means Committee with instructions not to report the bill back until April 15, 2001, unless Congress has completed action on the concurrent budget resolution for fiscal 2002. CQ Vote #44: Motion rejected 204-221: R 0-218; D 203-2; I 1-1
  • 3/8/01 – HR 3 – Income Tax Reduction – Nay – Passage of the bill that would lower federal income taxes by restructuring the five existing tax brackets into four — 10 percent, 15 percent, 25 percent and 33 percent. CQ Vote #45: Passed 230-198: R 219-0; D 10-197; I 1- 1
  • 3/28/01 – H. Con Res. 83 – Fiscal 2002 Budget Resolution – Nay – Flake, R-Ariz., substitute amendment on behalf of the Republican Study Committee (RSC), that calls for limiting fiscal 2002 discretionary funding to 2.9 percent ($6.7 billion less than the proposed increase) and cutting taxes by $2.3 trillion over 10 years. The amendment calls for $290 billion more than proposed defense increases over 10 years and $440 billion less than proposed increases for non-defense discretionary spending. CQ Vote #68: Rejected 81-341: R 79-139; D 1-201; I 1-1
  • 3/28/01 – H. Con. Res. 83 – Fiscal 2002 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the concurrent resolution that would set broad spending and revenue targets. The resolution calls for cutting taxes by $1.6 trillion over 10 years and reducing the publicly held debt over the same time period by $2.3 trillion. The resolution calls for $660.6 billion in discretionary spending for fiscal 2002, a 4 percent increase over the current level. It calls $13.8 billion more in defense spending, a 4.4 percent increase over the current level and $11.3 billion more in non- defense spending, 3.5 percent over the current level. The resolution would permit additional tax cuts if the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) increases its projected on- budget surplus estimates. CQ Vote #70: Adopted 222-205: R 218-2; D 3-202; I 1-1
  • 3/29/01 – HR 104 – Marriage Tax Reduction – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 104) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would reduce taxes by $399.2 billion over ten years by doubling both the married couples’ deduction and the child tax credit. The measure would gradually raise the standard deduction, expand the 15 percent income tax bracket, and raise the alternative minimum tax exemption, for married couples filing jointly to twice that of individuals filing singly. The bill would raise the earned-income amount used by joint filers to calculate the earned-income credit to 110 percent of the amount used by all other taxpayers. It also would gradually double the child tax credit to $1,000, and make the credit refundable.” (H. Res. 104, CQ Vote #71: Adopted 249-171: R 213-0; D 35-170; I 1-1
  • 3/29/01 – HR 6 – Marriage Tax Reduction – Nay – Passage of a bill that would reduce taxes by $399.2 billion over 10 years by doubling both the married couples’ deduction and the child tax credit. The measure would gradually raise the standard deduction, expand the 15 percent income tax bracket, and raise the alternative minimum tax exemption for married couples filing jointly to twice that of individuals filing singly. The bill would raise the earned-income amount used by joint filers to calculate the earned-income credit to 110 percent of the amount used by all other taxpayers. It also would gradually double the child tax credit to $1,000, and make the credit refundable. CQ Vote #75: Passed 282-144: R 217-0; D 64-143; I 1-1
  • 4/4/01 – HR 8 – Estate Tax Relief – Nay – Passage of the bill that would lower revenue by $185.5 billion over 10 years by reducing the estate, gift and generation-skipping taxes annually, cutting the top rate on assets over $3 million from 55 percent to 39 percent, with a complete repeal by 2011. Beginning in 2002, the unified gift and estate credit would be replaced with an exemption allowing the lowering of all taxable estates from 37 percent to 18 percent. Beginning in 2011, individuals inheriting more than $1.3 million ($3 million for spouses), would be required to pay capital gains taxes on any increase from the time the asset was acquired by the deceased until it was sold by the heir. CQ Vote #84: Passed 274-154: R 215-3; D 58-150; I 1-1
  • 5/9/01 – H. Con. Res. 83 – Fiscal 2002 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the conference report on the concurrent resolution to adopt a 10-year budget plan that calls for approximately $1.35 trillion in tax cuts through fiscal 2011, including a $100 billion stimulus package. The agreement would cap discretionary spending at $661.3 billion. Discretionary spending allocations would total $325.1 billion for defense and $336.2 billion for non-defense. CQ Vote #104: Adopted (thus sent to the Senate) 221-207: R 214-3; D 6-203; I 1-1
  • 5/16/01 – HR 1836 – Tax Cut Reconciliation – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 142) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would provide a tax-cut reconciliation measure, which would adjust marginal rates. CQ Vote #116: Adopted 220-207: R 217-0; D 2-206; I 1-1
  • 5/16/01 – HR 1836 – Tax Cut Reconciliation – Nay – Passage of the bill that would cut all income tax rates and make other tax cuts totaling $958.3 billion over 11 years. The bill would covert the five existing tax rate brackets, which range from 15 percent to 39.6 percent, to a system of four brackets with rates of 10 percent, 15 percent, 25 percent and 33 percent. CQ Vote #118: Passed 230-197: R 216-0; D 13-196; I 1-1
  • 5/26/01 – HR 1836 – Tax Cut Reconciliation – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 153) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would reduce taxes by $1.35 trillion through 2010 and include income tax rate cuts, relief of the ‘marriage penalty,’ phase out the federal estate tax, double the child tax credit, and provide incentives for retirement savings. CQ Vote #148: Adopted 213-177: R 209-0; D 3-176; I 1-1
  • 5/26/01 – HR 1836 – Tax Cut Reconciliation – Nay – Adoption of the conference report on the bill that would reduce taxes by $1.35 trillion through fiscal 2011 through income tax rate cuts, relief of the ‘marriage penalty,’ a phaseout of the federal estate tax, doubling the child tax credit, and providing incentives for retirement savings. A new 10 percent tax rate would be created retroactive to Jan. 1, and taxpayers would get rebate checks this summer of $300 for singles and $600 for couples. The bill would double the $500-per- child tax credit by 2010 and make it refundable; raise the estate tax exemption to $1 million in 2002 and repeal the tax in 2010; increase the standard deduction for married couples to double that of singles, beginning in 2005; and increase annual limits on contributions for Individual Retirement Accounts to $5,000. CQ Vote #149: Adopted 240-154: R 211-0; D 28-153; I 1-1
  • 10/24/01 – HR 3090 – Economic Stimulus – Nay – Passage of the bill that would grant $99.5 billion in federal tax cuts in fiscal 2002, and a total $159.4 billion in reductions over 10 years, for businesses and individuals. The bill would allow more individuals to receive immediate $300 and $600 refunds, accelerate a reduction of the 27 percent tax bracket to 25 percent, and lower the capital gains tax rate from 20 percent to 18 percent. It also would eliminate the alternative minimum tax for businesses, allow them to offset income over the last five years with current losses, and allow them to deduct more in depreciation costs. The bill would provide $3 billion to states for health insurance for the unemployed. CQ Vote #404: Passed 216-214: R 212-7; D 3-206; I 1-1
  • 12/20/01 – HR 3529 – Stimulus and Workers Benefits – Nay – Passage of the bill that would reduce individual and business taxes, extend unemployment benefits, provide a health insurance refundable tax credit and cost $89.8 billion in 2002 and a total $156.8 billion over 10 years. The bill would allow more individuals to receive immediate $300 refunds, reduce the 27 percent tax bracket to 25 percent effective Jan. 1, 2002, and increase the amount of income exempt from the alternative minimum tax. It would extend by 13 weeks unemployment benefits to displaced workers and offer a temporary 60 percent refundable tax credit for unemployed workers to buy health insurance. The bill would give businesses a 30 percent deduction for the purchase of new equipment and temporarily allow them to carryback their operating losses longer. It also would provide tax relief to individuals and businesses directly affected by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York.” (H.R. 3529, CQ Vote #509: Passed 224-193: R 214-2; D 9-190; I 1-1

2000

  • 2/10/00 – HR 6 – Alleviate “Marriage Penalty” Tax – Nay – Adoption of the rule (HRes 419) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill to alleviate the tax code’s ‘marriage penalty’. CQ Vote #12: Adopted 255-165: R 216-0; D 38-164; I 1-1
  • 2/10/00 – HR 6 – Alleviate “Marriage Penalty” Tax – Nay – Passage of the bill to reduce taxes for married couples by approximately $182 billion over 10 years. The measure would increase the standard deduction claimed by married couples to twice the amount claimed by single taxpayers. The upper boundary of the 15 percent tax bracket would gradually increase from 2003 to 2008 to twice the limit for singles. The measure also would allow couples to earn an additional $2,000 before being disqualified from receiving the earned income tax credit. CQ Vote #15: Passed 268-158: R 219-0; D 48-157; I 1-1
  • 3/9/00 – HR 3081 – Minimum Wage/Tax Revisions – Nay – Sessions, R-Tex., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule to provide for House floor consideration of two bills. One would increase the federal hourly minimum wage by $1 over three years. The other would provide nearly $46 billion over five years in tax cuts, including reductions of estate and gift taxes totaling $26.9 billion. CQ Vote #38: Motion agreed to 216-208: R 213-1; D 2-206; I 1-1
  • 3/9/00 – H. Res 434 – Minimum Wage/Tax Revisions – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 434) to provide for the House floor consideration of two bills. One would increase the federal hourly minimum wage by $1 over three years. The other bill would provide nearly $46 billion over five years in tax cuts, including reductions of estate and gift taxes totaling $26.9 billion. CQ Vote #39: Adopted 214-211: R 211-3; D 2-207; I 1-1
  • 3/9/00 – HR 3081 – Tax Revisions – Nay – Passage of the bill to provide about $46 billion over five years in tax cuts, including reductions of estate and gift taxes totaling $26.9 billion. The bill would also increase the deduction for health insurance for self-employed individuals to 100 percent beginning in 2001, authorize the Housing and Urban Development secretary to designate 15 renewal communities in both urban and rural areas, and increase the deductible percentage of business meal expenses to 60 percent in 2002. CQ Vote #41: Passed 257-169: R 215-1; D 41-167; I 1-1
  • 6/8/00 – H. Res. 519 – Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 519) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phase out the estate and gift taxes over a 10-year period. CQ Vote #249: Adopted 242-180: R 215-0; D 26-179; I 1-1
  • 6/9/00 – HR 8 – Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Passage of the bill that would amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to reduce and ultimately repeal the estate and gift tax by 2010. CQ Vote #254: Passed 279-136: R 213-0; D 65-135; I 1-1
  • 7/12/00 – HR 4810 – Alleviate “Marriage Penalty” Tax – Nay – Passage of the bill to reduce taxes for married couples by approximately $182 billion over 10 years. The measure would increase the standard deduction claimed by married couples to twice the amount claimed by single taxpayers. The upper boundary of the 15 percent tax bracket would gradually increase from 2003 to 2008 to twice the limit for singles. The measure also would allow couples to earn an additional $2,000 before being disqualified from receiving the earned income tax credit.” CQ Vote #392: Passed 269-159: R 220-0; D 48-158; I 1- 1
  • 7/20/00 – HR 4810 – Alleviate “Marriage Penalty” Tax – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res559) to provide for House floor consideration of the conference report that would reduce taxes for married couples by approximately $89.8 billion over five years. CQ Vote #417: Adopted 279-140: R 215-0; D 63-139; I 1-1
  • 7/20/00 – HR 4810 – Alleviate “Marriage Penalty” Tax – Nay – Adoption of the conference report of the bill that would reduce taxes for married couples by approximately $89.8 billion over five years. The measure would increase the standard deduction claimed by married couples to twice the amount claimed by single taxpayers. The upper boundary of the 15 percent tax bracket would gradually increase from 2000 to 2005 to twice the limit for singles. The measure also would allow couples to earn an additional $2,000 before being disqualified from receiving the earned income tax credit. The bill would also allow couples to use family tax credits without paying the alternative minimum tax. CQ Vote #418: Adopted 271-156: R 219-0; D 51-155; I 1-1
  • 7/27/00 – HR 4865 – Social Security Tax Repeal – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 564) to provide for House floor consideration of the bill that would repeal the provision in the 1993 law that increased the portion of Social Security benefits subject to taxation from 50 percent to 85. CQ Vote #447: Adopted 232-194: R 217-0; D 14-194; I 1-0
  • 7/27/00 – HR 4865 – Social Security Tax Repeal – Nay – Passage of the bill that would repeal the provision in the 1993 law that increased the portion of Social Security benefits subject to taxation from 50 percent to 85 for single taxpayers with incomes over $25,000 and married taxpayers filing jointly with incomes over $32,000 effective after Dec. 31, 2000. An amount equal to the revenues that would have been collected had the tax not been repealed would be transferred to the Medicare trust fund from the general fund. CQ Vote #450: Passed 265-159: R 212-3; D 52-155; I 1-1
  • 9/7/00 – HR 8 – Estate Tax Repeal – Nay – Passage, over President Clinton’s Aug. 31, 2000, veto, of the bill that would amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to reduce and ultimately repeal the estate and gift tax by 2010. CQ Vote #458: Rejected 274- 157: R 220-1; D 53-155; I 1-1
  • 9/13/00 – HR 4810 – Alleviate “Marriage Penalty” Tax – Nay – Passage, over President Clinton’s Aug. 5, 2000, veto, of the bill that would reduce taxes for married couples by approximately $89.8 billion over five years. The measure would increase the standard deduction claimed by married couples to twice the amount claimed by single taxpayers. The upper boundary of the 15 percent tax bracket would gradually increase from 2000 to 2005 to twice the limit for singles. The measure also would allow couples to earn an additional $2,000 before being disqualified from receiving the earned income tax credit. The bill would also allow couples to use family tax credits without paying the alternative minimum tax. CQ Vote #466: Rejected 270-158: R 221-0; D 48-157; I 1-1

1999

  • 3/25/99 – H. Con. Res. 68 – Fiscal 2000 Budget Resolution – Nay – Linder, R-Ga., motion to order the previous question (thus ending debate and the possibility of amendment) on adoption of the rule (H Res 131) to provide for House floor consideration of the resolution to set broad spending and revenue targets for the next ten years. The resolution calls for cutting taxes by $778.5 billion over ten years, declares all Social Security revenues off-limits for other uses, and calls for increases in defense and education. Because the budget resolution proposes to stay within the existing caps on discretionary spending, it would require the Appropriations Committee to make significant cuts in non-defense discretionary spending from the fiscal 1999 funding levels. CQ Vote #72: Motion agreed to 224-203: R 219-0; D 5-202; I 0-1
  • 3/25/99 – H. Con. Res. 68 – Fiscal 2000 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 131) to provide for House floor consideration of the resolution to set broad spending and revenue targets for the next ten years. The resolution calls for cutting taxes by $778.5 billion over ten years, declares all Social Security revenues off-limits for other uses, and calls for increases in defense and education. Because the budget resolution proposes to stay within the existing caps on discretionary spending, it would require the Appropriations Committee to make significant cuts in non-defense discretionary spending from the fiscal 1999 funding levels. CQ Vote #73: Adopted 228-194: R 214-0; D 14-193; I 0-1
  • 3/25/99 – H. Con. Res. 68 – Fiscal 2000 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the resolution to set broad spending and revenue targets for the next ten years. The resolution calls for cutting taxes by $778.5 billion over ten years, declares all Social Security revenues off-limits for other uses, and calls for increases in defense and education. Because the budget resolution proposes to stay within the existing caps on discretionary spending, it would require the Appropriations Committee to make significant cuts in non-defense discretionary spending from the fiscal 1999 funding levels. CQ Vote #77: Adopted 221-208: R 217-2; D 4-205; I 0-1
  • 4/14/99 – H. Con. Res. 68 – Fiscal 2000 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 137) to provide for House floor consideration of the conference report on the concurrent resolution to set broad spending and revenue targets for the next 10 years. Like both the House and Senate versions, the agreement represents the Republicans’ plan to reserve the surpluses in the Social Security program from other uses, provide substantial tax cuts over the next 10 years, and increase defense and education spending, while staying within the spending caps set in 1997. The conference agreement sets non- defense discretionary spending for fiscal 2000 at $43.7 billion less than in fiscal 1999, while defense spending would be $13.7 billion more than the current level. CQ Vote #84: Adopted 221-205: R 218-0; D 3-204; I 0-1
  • 4/14/99 – H. Con. Res. 68 – Fiscal 2000 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the conference report on the concurrent resolution to set broad spending and revenue targets for the next 10 years. Like both the House and Senate versions, the agreement represents the Republicans’ plan to reserve the surpluses in the Social Security program from other uses, provide substantial tax cuts over the next 10 years, increase defense and education spending, while staying within the spending caps set in 1997. The conference agreement sets non-defense discretionary spending for fiscal 2000 at $43.7 billion less than in fiscal 1999, while defense spending would be $13.7 billion more than the current level. CQ Vote #85: Adopted 220-208: R 217-3; D 3-204; I 0-1
  • 7/21/99 – HR 2488 – Tax Cut Package – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 256) to provide for House floor consideration of the $792 billion ten-year tax cut package. CQ Vote #330: Adopted 219-208: R 219-2; D 0-205; I 0-1
  • 7/22/99 – HR 2488 – Tax Cut Package – Nay – Passage of the bill to reduce federal taxes by $792 billion over 10 years. The measure would reduce individual income tax rates by 10 percent over a 10-year period, contingent upon annual progress in reducing interest on the nation’s debt. It would reduce the ‘marriage penalty’ by increasing the standard deduction for married couples to double that for singles; cut the capital gains tax rate for individuals from 20 percent to 15 percent for property held for more than one year; gradually lower the corporate capital gains tax rate from 35 percent to 30 percent by 2005; reduce the estate and gift tax rates until they are completely eliminated in 2009; accelerate the phase-in of a 100 percent deduction for health insurance premiums for the self-employed, and allow all taxpayers to deduct health care and long-term care insurance if employers pay 50 percent or less of the premium; increase the annual contribution limit for Education Savings Accounts from $500 to $2,000 and permit tax-free withdrawals to pay for public and private elementary and secondary tuition and expenses. CQ Vote #333: Passed 223-208: R 217-4; D 6-203; I 0-1
  • 8/5/99 – HR 2488 – Tax Reconciliation – Nay – Adoption of the rule (HRes274) to provide for House floor consideration of the conference report on the bill to reduce taxes by $792 billion over 10 years. CQ Vote #377: Adopted 224-203: R 220-0; D 4-202; I 0-1
  • 8/5/99 – HR 2488 – Tax Reconciliation – Nay – Adoption of the conference report on the bill to reduce taxes by $792 billion over 10 years. The conference report would reduce each of the five income tax rates by 1 percentage point, phase out the estate tax, and raise the standard deduction available to taxpayers filing jointly from $7,200 to $8,600 gradually over five years. The conference report would reduce the capital gains tax rate from 10 percent and 20 percent to 8 percent and 18 percent effective Jan. 1, 1999. CQ Vote #379: Adopted 221-206: R 216-4; D 5-201; I 0-1

1998

  • 4/1/98 – HR 2400 – Surface Transportation Reauthorization amendment – Nay – “Kasich, R-Ohio, amendment to eliminate all of the bill’s provisions, and instead turn over more control of transportation projects to the states and reduce the federal gas tax over a four-year period.” CQ Vote #97: Rejected 98-318: R 82-138; D 16-179; I 0-1
  • 6/4/98 – H. Con Res. 284 – Fiscal 1999 Budget Resolution Adoption – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 455) to provide for House floor consideration of the concurrent resolution to adopt a five-year budget plan to reduce federal spending over 1999-2003 by $101 billion below levels provided under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Savings from the spending cuts would finance tax cuts, including an elimination of the so-called marriage penalty. CQ Vote #205: Adopted 216-197: R 215-4; D 1-192; I 0-1
  • 6/4/98 – H. Con. Res 284 – Fiscal 1999 Budget Resolution Adoption – Nay – Adoption of the concurrent resolution to adopt a five-year budget plan that would create a surplus of $63.4 billion by 2003, by cutting spending by $101 billion over five years and using the funds to finance tax reduction which would include the elimination of the so-called marriage penalty. The plan calls for an increase, by $5 billion, in defense spending, over the caps agreed to under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The resolution sets binding levels for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 1999: budget authority, $1,730.4 billion; outlays, $1,721.9 billion; revenues, $1,755.6 billion; and surplus, $33.7 billion. CQ Vote #210: Adopted 216-204: R 213-9; D 3-194; I 0-1
  • 6/5/98 – H. Con Res 284 – Fiscal 1999 Budget Resolution Rule – Nay – Adoption of the rule (H Res 455) to provide for House floor consideration of the concurrent resolution to adopt a five-year budget plan to reduce federal spending over 1999-2003 by $101 billion below levels provided under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Savings from the spending cuts would finance tax cuts, including an elimination of the so-called marriage penalty. CQ Vote #205: Adopted 216-197: R 215-4; D 1-192; I 0-1
  • 6/5/98 – H. Con. Res. 284 0 Fiscal 1999 Budget Resolution – Nay – Adoption of the concurrent resolution to adopt a five-year budget plan that would create a surplus of $63.4 billion by 2003, by cutting spending by $101 billion over five years and using the funds to finance tax reduction which would include the elimination of the so-called marriage penalty. The plan calls for an increase, by $5 billion, in defense spending, over the caps agreed to under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The resolution sets binding levels for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 1999: budget authority, $1,730.4 billion; outlays, $1,721.9 billion; revenues, $1,755.6 billion; and surplus, $33.7 billion. CQ Vote #210: Adopted 216-204: R 213-9; D 3-194; I 0-1
  • 9/26/98 – HR 4579 – Tax Cuts – Nay – Passage of the bill to cut taxes by $80.1 billion over five years, including $6.6 billion in cuts in fiscal 1999, by extending expired provisions such as the research tax credit, reducing taxes for farmers and married couples and making health insurance premiums 100 percent deductible for the self-employed. CQ Vote #469: Passed 229-195: R 210-11; D 19-183; I 0-1

1997

  • 6/26/97 – HR 2014 – Fiscal 1998 Budget Reconciliation – Nay – “Passage of the bill to provide a net tax cut of $85 billion over five years, including $133 billion in gross tax cuts offset by $48 billion in revenue increases. The bill establishes a tax credit for each child under age 17, lowers the top capital gains tax rate from 28 percent to 20 percent, raises the amount exempt from the federal estate tax gradually from $600,000 to $1 million and provides $31 billion in education tax incentives that include a non-refundable credit of up to $1,500 for each student each year for the first two years of college.” (H.R. 2014, CQ Vote #245: Passed 253-179: R 226-1; D 27-177; I 0-1, June 26, 1997, Menendez voted Nay)

1995

  • 4/5/95 – HR 1215 – Tax and Spending Cuts – Nay – Passage of the bill to cut taxes by $189 billion over five years through a variety of proposals, including a $500-per-child tax credit for families earning up to $200,000 a year; the elimination of the corporate alternative minimum tax; a lowering of the capital gains tax rate from 28 percent to 19.8 percent; the easing of the ‘marriage penalty’ in the tax code; the establishment of “back loaded” individual retirement accounts; and the repeal of the 1993 tax increase on Social Security benefits. The cost of the bill would be offset through various proposals, including cutting discretionary spending by $100 billion over five years; increasing federal employees’ pension contribution; and freezing reimbursement rates in certain Medicare programs. CQ Vote #295: Passed 246-188: R 219-11; D 27-176; I 0-1

1993

  • 05/27/93 – HR 2264 Fiscal 1993 Budget Reconciliation – Yea – Passage of the five-year, $337 billion bill that closely follows President Clinton’s economic proposals. The bill would raise $250 billion in new revenues. Proposals in the bill include: a new top income bracket of 36 percent with a 10 percent surtax on income of more than $250,000; a tax increase on the Social Security benefits of better-off recipients; an increase in the Medicare payroll tax; an energy (Btu) tax; an increase in the corporate income tax rate to 35 percent; (H.R. 2264, CQ Vote #199: Passed 219-213: R 0-175; D 218-38; I 1-0, May 27, 1993, Menendez voted Yea)
  • 8/5/93 – 1993 Budget Reconciliation – Yea. “Adoption of the conference report to reduce the deficit by an estimated $496 billion over five years through almost $241 billion in additional taxes and $255 billion in spending cuts by closely tracking President Clinton’s economic proposals. Proposals in the bill include: a new top income tax bracket of 36 percent with a 10 percent surtax above $250,000 retroactive to Jan. 1, 1993; a tax increase on the Social Security benefits of wealthier recipients; an increase of 4.3 cents in the federal gas tax; a tax increase from 34 percent to 35 percent on corporate income above $10 million retroactive to Jan. 1, 1993; an auction of the public radio spectrum; a direct student loan program; $55.8 billion in Medicare cuts mostly through reductions in payments to providers; a delay in cost of living adjustments for military personnel; changes in federal retirement programs; (HR 2264, CQ Vote #406: Adopted 218- 216: R 0-175; D 217-41; I 1-0, August 5, 1993, Menendez voted Yea)

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